Bali Currency

The official currency of Bali is the rupiah (Rp), which consists of coin denominations ranging from 25 Rp to 1,000 Rp and banknotes starting at 1,000 Rp and going as high as 100,000 Rp. Although exchange rates vary daily, generally 1GBP will equal Rp 12,000.00, US$1 will equal Rp 8,000.00 and AUS$1 will equal Rp 7,000.00. The 50, 100 and 200 Rp coins are made of aluminium and feature the Kepodang, Palm Cockatoo and Bali Starling birds, while the 500 Rp coin is an aluminium/aluminium bronze alloy featuring the Jasmine flower. 1,000 Rp coins are a nickel plated steel or bi-metal nickel and aluminium bronze alloy featuring a Palm tree.

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Rupiah banknotes are made of long fibres of different types of wood which have been used to create a pulp that is then turned into banknotes. The 1,000 Rp banknote is blue and green in colour and features the likeness of Captain Pattimura, Ambonese soldier and National Hero of Indonesia. The 2,000 Rp banknote is grey in colour and features the likeness of Antasari, Prince of Banjar. The 5,000 Rp banknote is brown and green in colour and features the likeness of Tuanku Imam Bonjol, hero in the Indonesian struggle against Dutch rule.

The 10,000 Rp banknote is red and purple in colour and features the likeness of Sultan Mahmud Badaruddin II. The 20,000 Rp banknote is green in colour and features the likeness of Oto Iskandar di Nata, another key figure in Indonesia's liberation from the Dutch. The 50,000 Rp is blue in colour and features the likeness of I Gusti Ngurah Rai, a Lieutenant Colonel killed in Battle of Margarana during the Indonesian War of Independence. The 100,000 Rp is red in colour and features the likeness of Sukarno and Hatta, the first Indonesian President and Vice President.

Some hotels and restaurants may accept foreign currency, however, in most cases you will need to exchange your currency for rupiahs. Most major business centres provide currency exchange facilities and banks can also exchange your foreign currency, as can some hotels. If you exchange your foreign currency with a street money changer, ensure you count and recount your money yourself to avoid sneaky rip offs.