Picton Travel Guide

Located on the north east extremity of New Zealand’s South Island, Picton is a picturesque town in the famous wine-growing region of Marlborough. Situated 65km east of Wellington and approximately 25km north of Blenheim, Picton is positioned near the head of Queen Charlotte Sound. A perfect place to shop for souvenirs, Picton holidays are ideally located for exploring the stunning Marlborough Sounds.

This Picton travel guide is designed to help you make the most of your time in this gateway to island, marine and forest attractions. Picton enjoys a sheltered harbour and rather attractive seafront with plenty of seaside galleries, cafes and restaurants to while away your day. There’s also an aquarium, floating maritime museum and a variety of water-based activities. The Queen Charlotte Track is another popular attraction for active outdoor types.

Picton Attractions

One of the prettiest seaside towns in all of New Zealand, Picton boasts a fifth of the country’s coastline at its door. What could essentially be simply a charming little fishing village has rocketed to a world-class destination thanks to its fantastic climate and spectacular natural attractions, including the must-see Marlborough Sounds. No visit to Picton is complete without experiencing the crystal waters and secluded bays of the incredible Marlborough Sounds, however there is more to Picton than just that. Picton attractions also offer an aquarium, a floating maritime museum, sea kayaking, diving, scenic cruising, fishing and even dolphin watching. The adventurous outdoor types, the Queen Charlotte Track is another popular Picton attraction which you can conquer on foot but is also popular with mountain bikers.

Picton Facts

Picton was given its current name in 1859 in honour of Sir Thomas Picton, who was the Duke of Wellington’s Welsh military associate and who was killed fighting Napoleon in the Battle of Waterloo. Picton is home to the MS Mikhail Lermontov a former cruise liner which is now a popular wreck dive located 37m underwater at Port Gore. The 177m long wreck is one of the largest, most recent and most accessible shipwreck dives in the world but must be enjoyed with a guide as the hull lies on its starboard side and divers can become disoriented.